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As discussed in The Minaret, it is the only structure synonymous with a mosque. The inclusion of this feature is strengthened because of its integral use in the Environmental Design strategy. It is a simple brick tubular tower with an intricate water-jet cut stainless steel perforated grill set to a six pointed star pattern in plan as the crowning piece. This patterned sheet acts as the outlet for the prayer space’s passive ventilation strategy.

The rear of the proposal features a very ornate brickwork pattern based on Alvar Aalto’s Baker House method of using twisted and distorted overburnt bricks, set to the Brick Pattern generated from the Tomb of Chelebi Oghu. This pattern is used on the scheme’s facade to signify the religious parts of the building.

The aim of this project was to create something that sat comfortably. A building that was accepted by both Islamic and London cultures and that was happy in it’s context. It has taken heavily from Public Houses and addresses the corner of Shandy Park in a similar way to many examples such as The Wenlock Arms, breaking down any barrier threshold. The material selection of London Stock helps the structure to compliment it’s surroundings, being a exemplar of what can be achieved with the material. Ornamentation is kept subtle, especially on the street elevation, being used to signify the location of religious spaces and also creating visual barriers for private spaces. The rear elevations addressing the park are more extravagant in decoration but still in keeping with the scheme. Personally, I think it sits comfortably with a sense of belonging, in the true sense of the word.

The Prayer Hall is the heart of a mosque. Above is a visualization of the final proposed prayer space for the Shahjalal Mosque in Shandy Park. Taking the same principles of a lantern window to allow light in with expressed structure as previous proposals, as posted in Prayer Hall Interior Model. The space now creates a clear threshold between circulation and prayer space with the addition of colonnades flanking the space, whilst also creating a separate space to the rear for female prayer.

The proposed Shahjalal Mosque is a brick building. It will be built from London Stock for two reasons; that it is used by many other structures in the area and will give the building a local identity and that it is a locally sourced material, bringing the building’s construction embodied energy down dramatically.

One of the most important parts of this scheme is how the building addresses the corner of Shandy Park. Learning from the Wenlock Arms Public House, the corner of the proposed Shahjalal Mosque pushes right up to the boundary eliminating any privacy boundary that front gardens create. Here is an initial exterior perspective sketch to show this.