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The rear of the proposal features a very ornate brickwork pattern based on Alvar Aalto’s Baker House method of using twisted and distorted overburnt bricks, set to the Brick Pattern generated from the Tomb of Chelebi Oghu. This pattern is used on the scheme’s facade to signify the religious parts of the building.

Not long ago I put up a post called Fashion Street, in which I applauded the attempt to create an building which featured elements from both typical Islamic and British vernaculars. Above is a partial elevation of my current proposal for the Shahjalal Mosque in Shandy Park. It attempts to create a hybrid of the two vernaculars taking from Public House, Industrial, Traditional Islamic and British Domestic styles. You can see the change in hierarchy in fenestration much like a London Terrace, the Brick Pattern inspired by Alvar Aalto’s Baker House and the Etched Glass, which covets the play on public/privacy with ornate patterns of a Pub’s window. All in an attempt to create a building that would feel at home in Britain or an Islamic nation.

Above is an image of Alvar Aalto’s Baker House, Cambridge, Mass (1946-49) taken from Brick: A World History by James W.P. Campbell. Aalto’s use of brick as an elevational treatment for the Baker House is of particular interest because of his use of twisted and distorted overburnt bricks. They are used at intervals to add interest to the surface, but laid to protrude from the wall they would make an interesting contrast to regular bricks if applied to a Brick Pattern.

Constructed iaround 1353, Sultaniya, Iran; the Tomb of Chelebi Oghlu is a superb precedent for what can be achieved decoratively with brick. Using standardized dimensioned bricks a repetitive islamic geometric pattern has been created without what some would consider the excessive nature of Brick Expressionism. The subtle use of different colored bricks is similar in language to Alvar Aalto’s Baker House, where twisted and distorted overburnt bricks were used at intervals of a seemingly plain elevation.