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A notable cast from the series which culminated in the Final Concrete Cast. This cube uses the skeleton frame as originally proposed, but when struck revealed a quite beautiful concrete finish with inserted clear acrylic pattern. The skeleton was retained rather than removed and the whole cube was worked to give the concrete a more rough texture to contrast with the smooth acrylic, which was also worked to give a frosted finish.

The culmination of a series of concrete casts as discussed in Concrete Cube, Concrete Construction and Concrete Shuttering is shown above. A negative version of previously proposed versions, the contrast between where the aggregate has been exposed and the smooth finish from the shuttering is remarkable. The wallpaper pattern taken from The Grapes public house has been used to protect part of the cube whilst the exposed concrete has been worked back to reveal, in this case, recycled green glass aggregate.

The geometric patterns from Etching Pattern has been applied to glass to create a sample at 1:1. Here it has been photographed next to brickwork to show the contrast between the two proposed materials and how they sit in harmony.

Here on a square grid-basis, a spinning four-fold pattern has been developed with stabilizing star octagons.  Another example of Islamic Patterns, it adheres to a geometric rule of repetition and has been progressed further to create two zones; translucent and opaque.

The use of etched glass in public house fenestration is the perfect marriage of function and decoration. Used as a screen for privacy whilst also allowing light into a space, they are highly detailed ornamentation pieces. Much like wallpaper, the use of decorative patterns adds a sense of domesticity to a space, blurring the line between what is private and what is public.

The image shown is an illustration of how brickwork or paving blockwork could be cut to interlock structurally and create a spinning motif, which is one of the most frequently recurring patterns in Islamic art. Taken from Islamic Patterns by Keith Critchlow, I especially like it if used in the main foyer space. Orientated in the right way it aligns with both axis the proposed Mosque deals with with, that of the existing fabric and of Mecca, as discussed in Site Axis. It also starts to address the detailed domesticity that the Wallpaper gives The Grapes Public House.

Brick, despite being a commonly used material, is often understated. The limits are only really set by the designer’s imagination and the dimensions of the brick. Even then you can “cheat” by cutting, chamfering or even creating bespoke bricks. The problem however is exploring an idea’s potential. This is very difficult with brick as due to the size of them at 1:1 and when sketching it is very hard to investigate in the 3rd dimension.

Here scale bricks at 1:24 are used to model a pattern in relief.

The pattern used on one of the six sides to the Tomb of Chelebi Oghlu is clearly based, at least in part, on Kufic script; the oldest calligraphic form of the Arabic scripts. It also features a spinning motif, one of the most frequently recurring patterns throughout Islamic art. Here the pattern has been adapted to the sizes of standard bricks rather than square cross sectional ones used previously.

Constructed iaround 1353, Sultaniya, Iran; the Tomb of Chelebi Oghlu is a superb precedent for what can be achieved decoratively with brick. Using standardized dimensioned bricks a repetitive islamic geometric pattern has been created without what some would consider the excessive nature of Brick Expressionism. The subtle use of different colored bricks is similar in language to Alvar Aalto’s Baker House, where twisted and distorted overburnt bricks were used at intervals of a seemingly plain elevation.

Despite the regular use of domes, the Minaret is the only architectural feature that is synonymous with mosques. Above are two examples of highly decorated minarets, separated by just short of 900 years. The much discussed Brick Lane minaret, constructed at the end of 2009 is a stainless steel structure, rising up to 90ft in amongst a highly dense part of London. The minaret is the first religious structure added to a building that has been used to house worshipers of different religions over around four centuries and has been accused of pointlessly labeling a structure that does not require it. It is however a beautifully worked piece of metal sculpture. The Islamic pattern is clinically cut using some sort of Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM), most likely a water jet cutter; as suggested for cutting the Wallpaper Balustrade. The other, the Kalyan Minaret located in Bukhara, Uzbekistan. Constructed in 1127, this looks like a possible precedent for the whole Brick Expressionism movement, with the brick used as decoration and well as structure.