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The aim of this project was to create something that sat comfortably. A building that was accepted by both Islamic and London cultures and that was happy in it’s context. It has taken heavily from Public Houses and addresses the corner of Shandy Park in a similar way to many examples such as The Wenlock Arms, breaking down any barrier threshold. The material selection of London Stock helps the structure to compliment it’s surroundings, being a exemplar of what can be achieved with the material. Ornamentation is kept subtle, especially on the street elevation, being used to signify the location of religious spaces and also creating visual barriers for private spaces. The rear elevations addressing the park are more extravagant in decoration but still in keeping with the scheme. Personally, I think it sits comfortably with a sense of belonging, in the true sense of the word.

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One of the most important parts of this scheme is how the building addresses the corner of Shandy Park. Learning from the Wenlock Arms Public House, the corner of the proposed Shahjalal Mosque pushes right up to the boundary eliminating any privacy boundary that front gardens create. Here is an initial exterior perspective sketch to show this.

As shown in Collision Course, there is an aesthetic and structural language that is born from the marriage of East End London domestic architecture and traditional Islamic architecture. Finding the similarities between these two styles, such as the use of locally sourced materials and arched openings is key to creating a mosque that feels comfortable in Shandy Park. There is also a potency of creating a juxtaposition of rough industrial exterior against pure interiors required for prayer and the elements that bridge these two as investigated in Prayer Hall Interior Model.

Above is a photomontage of The Wenlock Arms public house and Lots Road Power Station, both located in London, amalgamated into one block. The Wenlock Arms deals with edge conditions extremely well, whilst Lots Road Power Stations uses a very traditional London Industrial architectural style, that also shares similarities with Islamic styles of elegant arched openings. This image acts as an aesthetic and architectural statement of what the mosque could be.